6.1 A. Research and Evaluations

 

Supporting high-risk victims of domestic violence: a review of Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs)

Steel, N. Blakeborough, L and Nicholas, S (2011)

The strategic narrative on Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) published in November 2010 announced that a review of MARACs would be undertaken in order to improve understanding of how MARACs are working and potential areas of including considering the case for putting MARACs on a statutory basis. This report presents the key findings of that review.

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Supporting the development of safe and effective responses within drug and alcohol agencies - Findings from Stage 1 of the MARAC Engagement Project

Harvey, S. and Rowlands, J (2011)

 Between October 2010 and March 2011, AVA’s Stella Project disseminated online questionnaires to MARAC Chairs and Managers of drug and alcohol agencies in all 32 London boroughs, and the City of London. Questionnaires were supplemented with telephone interviews with key respondents and data held by CAADA on selected MARACs who gave consent for their data to be shared with the Stella Project. This report is based on responses from 69 individuals, including 52 London substance misuse sector professionals and 17 London MARAC Chairs. All respondents completed an online questionnaire, including 13 who were also interviewed by phone.

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Reducing Repeat Victimisation among High Risk Victims of Domestic Violence: the benefits of a coordinated community response in Cardiff, Wales

Robinson, L.A (2006)

The goal of Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) is to provide a forum for sharing information and taking actions to reduce harm to high-risk domestic violence victims. Interviews with participants and victims, observations and police data reveal how the MARACs work in practice and also what they can accomplish. Results showed MARACs to be invaluable: agencies assisted victims more efficiently, primarily through enhanced information sharing. MARACs improve victims’ safety: both police and victim data revealed that 6 in 10 victims had not been re-victimised. These positive results demonstrate the benefits of a coordinated community response.

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The Perception of High Risk Victims of Domestic Violence to Coordinated Community Response in Cardiff, Wales

Robinson, L.A (2006)

Research was conducted with very high-risk victims of domestic violence to determine their levels of re-victimisation one year after being referred to a Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC) and their perceptions of this type of intervention. The MARACs provide increased and ongoing communication between agencies and victims, risk assessments, advocacy to victims, help translating policy into action, and help in holding perpetrators to account. More than 4 in 10 victims reported no further violence one year after the MARAC. Nearly all victims first attributed responsibility for ending the violence to themselves, and then acknowledged the importance of having multi-agency support once they were ready to change their situations. This research reveals that taking a holistic multi-agency approach to domestic violence can reduce recidivism, even among the population most at risk.

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Domestic Violence MARACS (Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conferences) for Very High-Risk Victims in Cardiff Wales: a process & outcome evaluation

Robinson, Dr. L.A. (2004)

This evaluation of Cardiff MARACs over a six month period incorporated police data and victim interviews, evaluating the process of how a multi-agency approach works to reduce harm, with the outcome evaluation looking at what the MARAC is able to accomplish, with a particular focus on whether safety was increased and fear of violence reduced.

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